London – Swinging Sixties – Capital of Cool – Harold Chapman

Hard to believe and yet it’s already half a century ago that these images were taken by renown documentary photographer Harold Chapman from England. They are intriguing visual snippets of a time describes like:

“For a few years in the 1960s, London was the world capital of cool. When Time magazine dedicated its 15 April 1966 issue to London: the Swinging City, it cemented the association between London and all things hip and fashionable that had been growing in the popular imagination throughout the decade.

London’s remarkable metamorphosis from a gloomy, grimy post-War capital into a bright, shining epicenter of style was largely down to two factors: youth and money. The baby boom of the 1950s meant that the urban population was younger than it had been since Roman times. By the mid-60s, 40% of the population at large was under 25. With the abolition of National Service for men in 1960, these young people had more freedom and fewer responsibilities than their parents’ generation. They rebelled against the limitations and restrictions of post-War society. In short, they wanted to shake things up…

Added to this, Londoners had more disposable income than ever before – and were looking for ways to spend it. Nationally, weekly earnings in the ‘60s outstripped the cost of living by a staggering 183%: in London, where earnings were generally higher than the national average, the figure was probably even greater.

This heady combination of affluence and youth led to a flourishing of music, fashion, design and anything else that would banish the post-War gloom. Fashion boutiques sprang up willy-nilly. Men flocked to Carnaby St, near Soho, for the latest ‘Mod’ fashions. While women were lured to the King’s Rd, where Mary Quant’s radical mini skirts flew off the rails of her iconic store, Bazaar.

Even the most shocking or downright barmy fashions were popularised by models who, for the first time, became superstars. Jean Shrimpton was considered the symbol of Swinging London, while Twiggy was named The Face of 1966. Mary Quant herself was the undisputed queen of the group known as The Chelsea Set, a hard-partying, socially eclectic mix of largely idle ‘toffs’ and talented working-class movers and shakers.”

The images ( Signed B/W Prints, mostly period prints, Silver Gelatin on PE, sizes vary, are available at The OMC Gallery) If you’re interested, contact us for details, please!

OMC Artprice Store

Open 24/7 – Affordable Contemporary Art ! Buying art on the internet has improved immensely during the last decade and  is used by a growing number of collectors worldwide. Additionally to our own gallery website activities, we thought it might be a good idea to cooperate  with a trusted and competent player in the market,, to spread the word about a range of great pieces currently available at The OMC Gallery and those to come.

Thank you for your interest!

Rolf Goellnitz

Most Art Is Affordable!

Anybody, who reads about those Multimillion Dollar deals, realized mainly at auctions, held by Christie’s, Sotheby’s and Phillips, must get the impression that any art of any artist by most means is not affordable. Fact is the opposite and I like to quote in this context from the latest Contemporary Art Market Report published by (CEO Thierry Ehrmann):

…”Art is not exclusively reserved for well-advised investors or wealthy initiates. The lion’s share of the market remains within reach of those with small or moderate budgets. Each year, between 100,000 and 200,000 works of art produced by clearly identified artists (irrespective of creation period) are sold at auction for less than €10,000 throughout the world, and around 80% of lots can be acquired for under €5,000. There is thus a huge choice, and it is possible to make significant acquisitions without spending a fortune. The spectacular results we see in the media concern a minute proportion in an overall market that is only unaffordable by reputation. In the contemporary field, results higher than €50,000 involve 6% of the lots sold, and hammer prices of several millions only 0.3%. Art is not unaffordable: the largest range in the offer – 66% of contemporary works – consists of pieces that can be bought for less than €5,000″…

Have a pleasant weekend,

Rolf Goellnitz

Precious Blue

An exhibition by International Artists
Curated by Rolf Goellnitz

Blue is the overwhelming “favorite color” of most people around the world. It’s also said that it is the least gender specific color and equally appeals to both women and men.
In color psychology ‘Blue” is associated with “Intellectual, intelligence, communication, trust, efficiency, serenity, duty, logic, coolness, reflection, calm.
Blue is the color of the mind and is essentially soothing; it affects us mentally, rather than the physical reaction we have to Red. Strong blues will stimulate clear thought and lighter, soft blues will calm the mind and aid concentration. Consequently it is serene and mentally calming. It is the color of clear communication.  However, it can be also perceived as cold, unemotional and unfriendly.
Different shades of “Blue” are perceived also differently:
Pale Blue is considered to inspire creativity and the freedom to break free. One of the calmest colors, sky blue inspires selfless love and fidelity. It is non-threatening and promotes a helpful nature that can overcome all obstacles. It is regarded as the universal healer. Dark blue is the color of conservatism and responsibility. Although it appears to be cool, calm and collected, it is the color of the non-emotional worrier with repressed feelings, the pessimist and the hypocrite. Dark blue can be compassionate but has trouble showing it as its emotions run deep. Dark blue is a serious masculine color representing knowledge, power, and integrity, and is used quite often in the corporate world.

Artists in the exhibition:

Michael Burges – Germany
Jose Freixanes – Spain
Alexis Gorodine – France
Brooke Lydecker – USA
Maler Ravic & Dale Yudelman (South Africa)
Birgit Sauer – Austria
Katharina Sieverding – Germany
Ernst Wille – Germany

Reception for the exhibition is FRIDAY, October 10, 6:30 to 8:30PM.

Please note:
Opening hours WED to SAT 2-6PM and by appointment
Between October 18 and 25  OMC Gallery will be closed.


Sources for Blue:,

%d bloggers like this: